The Anne Frank Sapling Project

In 2009, the Holocaust Memorial Center was one of eleven sites to receive a sapling from the chestnut tree that so inspired Anne Frank.  During the three years while the sapling was in quarantine, an exhibit and several programs were developed to complement and expand on the themes inspired by Anne Frank's The Diary of a Young Girl.  Learn more about the project by clicking on the links below:

 

The Viola and Garry Kappy Anne Frank Tree Exhibit and Garden

The Viola and Garry Kappy Anne Frank Tree Exhibit and Garden is a two-part permanent exhibit located in the Harry and Wanda Zekelman International Institute of the righteous, where visitors can experience a sapling from the chestnut tree that grew behind Anne Frank's hiding place. 

The exhibit includes information about Anne Frank, as well as the people who sheltered the occupants of the Annex.  This living exhibition highlights the extraordinary life of Anne Frank and celebrates her legacy of hope.  Learn more >

My Name is Anne Frank: A Cantata

On May 7, 2013 at 7:00 pm, more than 800 guests filled the Berkley High School auditorium to see the American premiere of My Name is Anne Frank: A Cantata in partnership with the Berkley School District.  Composed by Volker Blumenthaler and librettist Alexander Gruber, the cantata was performed by the Berkley High School Orchestra and A Capella Choir, featuring Cantor Daniel Gross and Cantor Penny Steyer. 

View the performance >

The Anne Frank Curriculum

The use of personal materials, such as Anne Frank's diary, has long been considered an appropriate and effective method for introducing and connecting students to the Holocaust.  Before such an understanding can be created, students must be provided an introduction to the Holocaust, how it came about, and the people who were involved.  The Anne Frank Curriculum was developed to guide educators through the teaching of The Definitive Edition of The Diary of Anne Frank, fitted properly within the context of the Holocaust.

The Anne Frank Curriculum is a four-part education tool, which includes the following materials:

  • Contents and Guidelines for Educators orient educators to the curriculum as well as provide suggested readings, curricula, and resources for before visiting the Holocaust Memorial Center.
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  • Post-Visit Teacher's Guide aids educators in placing The Diary of Anne Frank within the framework of the Holocaust and provides a guide to the student handouts and workbook.
    Download
  • Student Handouts include two classroom activities for students based on The Diary of Anne Frank.
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  • Student Workbook is a key tool for students reflect upon The Diary of Anne Frank, learn about the occupants of the annex, the revisions to Anne Frank's Diary.  It also includes questions which allow students to place the diary within the larger context of the Holocaust.
    Download

The Anne Frank Curriculum was introduced during two special seminars for educators on July 21 and 22, 2013.

The Anne Frank Curriculum was funded through a grant by the Jewish Women's Foundation of Metropolitan Detroit.  Additional support was provided by the Jewish Federation of Metropolitan Detroit's Alliance for Jewish Education.

The Anne Frank Door Project

The Anne Frank Door Project is an art project designed for children in grades 5-8 which gave participants the opportunity to learn about Anne Frank.  Attendees were asked to interpret Anne's experience and relate it to their own through art.  Each participant decorated a wooden door and included a meaningful quote and photo of him/herself.

The Anne Frank Door Project was hosted by Tamarack Camps on June 21, 2013 and July 26,2013 and the Oak Park Public Library on July 25, 2013. 

Funding was provided through the Michigan Humanities Council, an affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities, the DeRoy Testamentary Foundation, and the Community Foundation for Southeast Michigan.

The Anne Frank Journaling Project

We invite children 5th grade and up and their families to participate in our Anne Frank Journaling Project on October 6, 2013 at 1:00 pm.  Each participant will meet a Holocaust survivor, explore our new Anne Frank Tree Exhibit and Garden, and have the opportunity to start their journal.  Journals, writing supplies, and refreshments will be provided.

The Anne Frank Journaling Project is made possible in part by a grant from the Michigan Humanities Council, an affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities, the DeRoy Testamentary Foundation, and by the Community Foundation for Southeast Michigan.

The Anne Frank Film Project

The film Anne Frank Remembered, an award-winning documentary, will be shown at the Holocaust Memorial Center on October 13, 2013 at 7:00 pm and in the Eastern Michigan University Student Center Auditorium on October 15, 2013 at 7:00 pm.

The fillm will be introduced and placed in context by a humanities scholar and discussion will follow.  Anne Frank Remembered tells the story of the Frank family through previously unreleased archival material, contemporary interviews, and reels filmed in the actual locations from Anne Frank's life.  The film, made in association with the Anne Frank House, includes the only known film footage taken of Anne Frank.

This program is made possible in part by a grant from the Michigan Humanities Council, an affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities, the DeRoy Testamentary Foundation, and by the Community Foundation for Southeast Michigan.